Auguste Rodin Iris, messagère des dieux, conceived circa 1890–1891 photographed by Mike Bruce
Auguste Rodin Iris, messagère des dieux, conceived circa 1890–1891 photographed by Mike Bruce

At the beginning of September 1959, Francis Bacon travelled to Cornwall, seeking to escape the distractions of London, and took out a six-month rental on a studio in St Ives from the artists William Redgrave and Peter Lanyon. One evening at a party in St Ives, Redgrave noticed Bacon talking with Brian Wall; Bacon asked Wall what he did. ‘I’m a sculptor’, replied Wall; ‘How interesting’, Bacon retorted, before continuing, ‘actually there are only three: Michelangelo, Rodin and Brancusi.’ This provocative response not only confirms Bacon’s high estimation of Rodin, but also coincides exactly with the period in which Rodin’s sculpture was paradigmatic in his paintings. Movement and Gravity: Bacon and Rodin in dialogue is the first exhibition that has ever been dedicated to exploring the dialogue and connections between Francis Bacon and Auguste Rodin, and will be staged at Ordovas from 8 February to 6 April 2013.


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Movement and Gravity
Bacon and Rodin in dialogue

8 February — 6 April 2013

Gallery Hours:
Tue–Fri: 10:00–18:00
Sat: 11:00–15:00